Mark Twain, American writer, Kensal Rise Library, Dollis Hill House

Mark Twain, American author, visited Britan at the turn of the century and had a connection with Brent.

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Dollis Hill House during restoration

'I have never seen any place that was so satisfactorily situated, with its noble trees and stretch of country, and everything that went to make life delightful, and all within a biscuit's throw of the metropolis of the world'

Mark Twain on his stay at Dollis Hill House, 'Innocents Abroad'

Samuel Langhorne Clemens

Born 30th November 1835
Died 21 April 1910

Mark Twain is a pseudonym of SAMUEL LANGHORNE CLEMENS, American humorist, writer, and lecturer who won a worldwide audience for his stories of youthful adventures, especially The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876), Life on the Mississippi (1883), and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884).

Dollis Hill

In 1900, Sir Hugh Gilzean Reid, who was leasing Dollis Hill House, invited the famous humorist, Mark Twain, to stay with him.

Mark Twain left Ameria for Europe in 1891 to evade his creditors, and returned in autumn 1900.

The writer, who was famous for his perceptive comments on the places he visited (read his Innocents Abroad, for instance), spoke of the delight he had in living there. "He had," he said, "never seen any place that was so satisfactorily situated, with its noble trees and stretch of country, and everything that went to make life delightful, and all within a biscuit's throw of the metropolis of the world".

Kensal Rise Library

In September 1900 Mark Twain opened the Kensal Rise Library. Mark Twain was presented with an inscribed silver key for his services, and in return gave the Chairman of the Library Committee, Charles Pinkham (of Purves Road), a signed photograph of himself and five of his own books.

 

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